Read About: Building a Herd and Hope ~ COVID-19 Relief in Response to Disruption of Educational Services for Vets ~ Holidays are Near and Wine Time is Here ~ Results of Annual Fisheries Surveys on Fresno Reservoir ~ Region 6 Havre Check Station Results after Opening Weekend of General Hunting Season.

Our Regular Features: Ranching for Profit – Top 10 Challenges in Ranching ~ Joyce Meyer – Enjoying Everyday Life – The Key to Peacefully Trusting God ~ Dave Ramsey – Dave Says – Jump in! ~ Things to Know ~ Classifieds.

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Building a Herd and Hope

Beginning rancher revitalizes retired CRP to grow her herd and wildlife habitat

By Laura C. Nelson, Ranchers Stewardship Alliance

The old homestead still stands sentinel on the hill. Weathered, worn abandoned long ago, Heather Martin has often looked at the relic and wondered just how the brother-sister duo who claimed this parcel more than a century ago thought they could make a living off such a small sliver of sandy soil.

“There’s no well, no running water, and when this reservoir dries up, there’s nothing,” the Phillips County rancher says, nodding to the still pool nestled in the natural basin. “Maybe they got more rain back then, maybe it held more snow – I just don’t know. It had to have been a tough living.”

The decades wore on, and making a living on that land didn’t get easier. It was plowed, then entered into the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) in the 1990s, indicating it was considered marginal cropland at best. Planted to crested wheatgrass, a non-native but prolific species, the land was left to weather the elements like the homestead decades before. The crested wheatgrass took root and covered the bare ground as intended, but wildlife search for tender, native grasses to graze. Dead growth became a barrier to new life.

Still, like many before her, Martin saw opportunity. “I was trying to grow; we were running out of ground. I was just trying to make it work, this ranching deal,” she says. “It’s all I’ve ever wanted to do.” Cattle, like the wildlife before, would likely turn their noses up at the brittle, nutrient-poor overgrown and dead vegetation, and Martin feared it was a tinder box of bad luck waiting for a lightning strike and an uncontrollable blaze.

She knocked down what she could with a swather and baled the worst stands the year she bought it. But with a land payment pressing, there was no time for further renovations. The dilapidated fence line was ragged at best: “That first year, I was getting heifers in every day. Every day! But what could I do? I had to use it.”


A previous owner had interspersed some alfalfa seed, and native vegetation began inching its way back in. Still, the land was ready to teach her the same lesson it doled out to generations of westerners before: dreams, ambition, hard work and know-how doesn’t mean much without water.

“In 2017, I hauled water every day to this pasture. The reservoir dried all the way up. If you’ve ever had to haul water, you know – I’m haying, trying to get everything else done, and it’s up at 4 or 5 o’clock in the morning to haul water, then off to work or to help someone else on their place and back at 11 o’clock at night to fill the trough,” she recalls. “My heart is here – these cows, they’re my heart – but I don’t know. Sometimes you wonder if it makes sense, if it’s really worth it, you know?”

Hope in a hard time

“In 2017, the panic was on – everyone in Phillips County was out of water,” Sage Grouse Initiative Rangeland Conservationist Martin Townsend says. “That summer was a record-setting drought, so it really highlighted where people were low on water. At that point, available water became the most limiting resource for agricultural production.”

When Heather Martin approached the local Farm Service Agency office for potential water development funding, she learned that due to high demand, it would be at least a year before cost-share would be available. Instead, she was directed to the Natural Resources Conservation Service to inquire about new conservation funding available through the Ranchers Stewardship Alliance (RSA). There, she was introduced to Townsend, who also serves as RSA’s volunteer Conservation Committee Coordinator.

The Ranchers Stewardship Alliance was formed in 2003 as a rancher-led conservation organization based in Malta, Montana. In 2017, RSA was awarded its first $300,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Northern Great Plains Program for local rangeland improvements to benefit grassland birds, rangeland health and working landscape through livestock grazing.

The grant money would be administered through the Ranchers Stewardship Alliance’s newly formed Conservation Committee, a collaboration of ranchers, state and federal agencies and conservation organizations.

“The first phase of that grant money was specifically focused on expiring CRP land that could be put into a grazing system,” Townsend says. “The goal is to reduce the risk of cultivation and keep grasslands for grassland birds, while supporting working lands, ranching and the rural community.”

Heather Martin’s project was the perfect fit, smack in the middle of priority habitat for grassland birds like the chestnut-collared and McCown’s longspur. The pasture also falls just outside the core area near a sage grouse migratory corridor and has several active leks (breeding grounds) within a five-mile radius.

It marked all the boxes in promoting biodiversity and healthy wildlife habitat, but most rewarding, Townsend says, is that it offered resilience to a rancher working to grow her herd.

“We want her operation to be functional, because when it is, it’s functional for wildlife, too,” Townsend says.

To do that, the RSA Conservation Committee proposed to drill a new well, install 6,000 feet of livestock pipeline, install two fiberglass water tanks with bird ramps and construct 1.2 miles of perimeter and internal fencing. With a nearly one-to-one match, Martin purchased the tanks and labor to construct the fencing and in turn, the Ranchers Stewardship Alliance would pay to install the well, pipeline and purchase fencing supplies.

“It’s a godsend,” Martin says. “In less than eight months, I had water on this place. I couldn’t believe it.”

Resilience for a first-time rancher

The pickup bounces across what may have once been farming tracks in the hip-high, new growth. The new water system has allowed her to look at this land differently. When she relied on the reservoir for water, it could only be grazed in early spring when water ran. In the first year after the well was drilled and pipeline installed, she was able to experiment with winter grazing with cattle foraging into December. Now, she can rest the pasture through the spring and summer to allow fresh regrowth.

She’s not the only one reaping the benefits of the reinvigorated landscape.

She’s mid-sentence when she stops the pickup abruptly and points: “Grouse.”

There, nestled in the swaying sweet clover, the female sage grouse finds cover. Earlier in the spring, the shorter, new grass would be ideal for songbirds, and throughout the year, antelope move through the landscape. In recent years, Martin has seen more elk making their way through her pastures, and one year, she spotted a rogue moose.

“That’s the beauty of a grazing system,” rancher and RSA Conservation Committee chair Sheila Walsh says. “It creates diversity on the landscape that a variety of wildlife needs to thrive. But what’s just as important to us is that it can allow a young rancher to thrive, too.”

Martin still has more fencing work to complete her end of the RSA conservation match. The cross-fencing will help her create an even more detailed grazing plan and add more options to her breeding program. As she develops her herd, she’s working toward more purebred breeding stock to sell. She’s in her second year offering registered Red Angus bulls in collaboration with the Rough Country Breeders sale and sees opportunity to offer more.

“I just love what I do,” she says. Sticking with it involves a lot of stubbornness, she laughs, but it also requires a bigger team. “Starting out on my own and building my own program has been hard,” she says. “But I’ve had a lot of people pulling for me in places I needed them. And for that, I’m thankful.”

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Note to editors: Word count = 1,275. Five photos attached. Cattle images are courtesy of Sandra Peterson-Kindle. Images of Heather Martin and wildlife are by Laura C. Nelson, Ranchers Stewardship Alliance.

About Ranchers Stewardship Alliance, Inc.: In 2003, about 30 ranching families in northern Montana came together to resolve common problems they faced. Now known as RSA, this rancher-led conservation organization works to strengthen our rural community, economy and culture. Our mission is to help multi- generational and beginning ranchers build the collaborative, trusting relationships and community-based solutions they need to create healthy, working landscapes and vibrant rural communities.

About the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation: Chartered by Congress in 1984, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) protects and restores the nation’s fish, wildlife, plants and habitats. Working with federal, corporate, and individual partners, NFWF has funded more than 5,000 organizations and generated a total conservation impact of $6.1 billion. Learn more at www.nfwf.org.

COVID-19 Relief in Response to Disruption of Educational Services for Vets

Veterans who were or are currently enrolled in an educational program, college, or training school that was closed temporarily or permanently or who lost approval to receive VA benefits funds for education are encouraged to submit an Education Benefits Title Restoration Request to have their educational benefits restored. Some limited exceptions include restoring entitlement only for the period of enrollment in which the veteran student/ participant did not receive credit or in which you lost training time.

For more information, visit https://www.vba.va.gov/pubs/forms/VBA- 22-0989-ARE.pdf or contact local VA resource centers with help filling out forms.

Download this image for your child to color by clicking the download link below!

Things to Know: Free postings for Non-Profit Community Events

Nov 4-12: ASMSU-N Student Senate Food Pantry Food Drive. Contact Riley (301-1384 or asmsunpres@msun.edu) or Tammy (265-3732 or tammy. boles@msun.edu) for details or how you can pitch in!

Nov 7: 10a-4p: 2020 Historical Society/Museum Specialty Fair at Phillips County Museum & H.G. Robinson House along Highway 2 in Malta. Sports are available for $20 (no table) & $30 (with a table). You must pay beforehand to be guaranteed a spot & vendors are asked to stay at the event until 4 p.m. For more information, call 654-1037 or stop by the museum today!

Nov 7: Julia’s Junque Christmas Open House in Malta. 10-4 p.m.

Nov 10: Rise and Restore Pre-Conference Virtual Summit Sponsered by Headwaters RC&D. This live event is focused on Resident Recruitment in Rural America. For details, visit the Facebook Event page.1

Nov 12-14: FFA’s 2020 John Deere Ag Expo will have live and virtual events in 14 communities across the state including Havre, Glasgow, Shelby, Lewistown, and Great Falls. Volunteers are needed to help with judging. Please visit foundation@montanaffa.org or call 582-4118 to sign up or learn more!

Nov 14: Havre Elks Cribbage Tournament. Call Brandy for more information at 390-009

Nov 14 & 15: Tom Knudsen 5th Annual Memorial Pool Tournament at the Mint Bar in Malta. $25 dollar entry fee. Please register by 8:30 a.m. on Saturday. Pre-tourney Friday, November 13th, sign up at 6 P.M. Call Susan for details at 654-4051 or 654-1621

Nov 18: Day Eagle Hope Project will be doing a food basket delivery for cancer survivors

Nov 19: 8:00 a.m., Training “How to Make it Work for You” Hosted by NADC PTAC & Native American Development Corporation. To register, visit: https://nadc.webex.com/nadc/k2/j.php?MTID=t80251266a8277f475c 6daf9a758d5

Nov 29: 11:59 p.m. CST: Last Day to register for Individual Walker or Runner to join to Gobbles’ Free Range 5K with others who are looking for a fun way to enjoy fitness and move closer to the end of 2020. Contact Tawna Richman at 945-5999 or visit www.runsignup.com for details.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings along the Hi-Line:

Chinook: Tuesdays @ 8 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church
Harlem: Wednesdays @ 7:30 p.m. at the Library (will resume meeting at Ft. Belknap at a later date)
Harlem: Fridays @ 7 p.m. at the Library (regular meeting time/place)
Hays: Tuesdays @ 7 p.m. at the Eagle Child Health Center
Malta: Mondays @ 12 noon at the Villa Theatre (rear entrance)
Malta: Wednesdays @ 8 p.m. at the Villa Theatre (rear entrance)
Malta: Thursdays @ 12 noon at the Villa Theatre (rear entrance)
Malta: Saturdays @ 4 p.m. at Nick’s House (139 9th Street Southwest)
Malta: Sundays @ 7 p.m. at the Villa Theatre (rear entrance)
Dodson: Mondays @ 8 p.m. at Ron K’s House
Chester: Thursdays @ 7 p.m. at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church
Box Elder: Tuesdays @ 6 p.m. at the Box Elder Catholic Church
Rocky Boy: Wednesdays @ 6 p.m. at the Upper Box Elder Road Big Blue Building next to White Sky Hope Facility
Glasgow and Havre have meetings every day…
Call the Area 40 HOTLINE anytime for support and meeting information at 1-833-800- 8553
or visit https://aa-montana.org/index.php?city=Area%2040

Montana Army National Guard is looking for YOU! For more information contact SGG Bakken at 406-324-5447. There are several financial incentives for joining the guard, but the rewards of serving our State is far greater.

Wednesdays and Fridays from 12noon-4ish p.m. Granny’s Closet in downtown Harlem is open! More shoes and clothes have been added. Lots of goodies available.

New Rural Grant Opportunity Applications now available for a new round of nationwide relief for small businesses in rural communities. The application window closes quickly. To learn more, visit https://lisc.org/covid-19/small-business-assitance/small-business- relief-grants/lowes/ or visit the Great Northern Development Facebook page.

Blaine County Library at Chinook announces Storytime at the Library! Every Tuesday at 10:30am in the Children’s area at the library. Need more information? Follow the Blaine County Library Facebook page, check out their website at www.blainecountylibrary.org, or call 357-2932. The library is open Mondays 12-7pm Tuesdays 10am-6pm, Wednesdays 12-7pm, Thursdays 10am-6pm, and Fridays noon to 5pm.

Phillips County Library is currently hosting the Carnegie Libraries Carnegie traveling exhibit. Phillips County residents are invited to come learn more about the history of Montana’s 17 Carnegie libraries, which were built across the state at the turn of the 20th century. For more information, call the library at 654-2407 or stop by Mon-Thu (10-12/1- 6) or Fridays (10-12/1-5).

Havre Beneath the Streets is OPEN for business. Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. until further notice. Call 265-8888 for tour times and booking reservations.

HRDC in Havre is seeking donations for specific, new (unopened, not used) items for their Victim Services Program. Items include diapers, new packages of socks and undergarments, new baby and children’s clothes, paper products, new women’s clothing, and more. Please visit the website or call 265-6743 for more information. At this time, HRDC cannot accept used donations due to COVID-19 restrictions. Thank you for your support.

Quarterly meetings held 3rd Wed. of Jan., Apr., Jul., & Oct at 10am: VOLUNTEERS INVITED! BLAINE COUNTY LOCAL AREA COMMITTEE FOR MENTAL HEALTH meets in Youth Court Services in the basement of the courthouse. All interested parties are welcome to attend! Call 406-357-2369 for details.

DAVE SAYS: Dave Ramsey is a personal money management expert, popular national radio personality and the author of three New York Times bestsellers – The Total Money Makeover, Financial Peace Revisited and More Than Enough. In them, Ramsey exemplifies his life’s work of teaching others how to be financially responsible, so they can acquire enough wealth to take care of loved ones, live prosperously into old age, and give generously to others.

Jump in!

Dear Dave,
I recently received my master’s degree in finance, and for the last four years I’ve had a job as a social worker. I love my job and have a decent income, but I know I could make more money and come closer to reaching my full potential in the finance industry. I’m on Baby Step 2, and I have lots of debt. On top of this, my dad lives with me and needs transplant surgery. I’ll have to take six weeks off work when he has this done, and my current job has always been very supportive of his healthcare needs. Should I wait until after the procedure to look for a job in the finance field? Will the fact that I won’t be a brand new graduate at that point make finding something difficult? -Rachel

Dear Rachel,
Not at all. You can seek employment in anything you want anytime you want. But I

think you’re putting the cart before the horse a little bit here. It sounds like you’re assuming you won’t be able to find an employer in the finance world that will understand your situation and work with you where you dad is concerned.

If you were interviewing at my company, and we determined you were an amazing person and a perfect fit for the job, we’d take a look at things and do what we could to work things out to where we could bring you on and help you through the situation. So, in my mind, it doesn’t reflect badly on you at all to be seeking a better job now.

Now, if you found yourself in an interview where the company reeked of that hardcore, corporate, no-days-off-no-matter-what crap, well, you obviously wouldn’t take the job. Always remember that in a job interview you’re interviewing them just as much as they’re interviewing you. You have to decide if they’re a good fit for you as much as they need to see if you’re the right person for them.

Honestly? It sounds to me a little like you’re just trying to stay in your comfort zone, kiddo. I think you need to go swimming. Jump in! The water’s fine.

—Dave

Holidays are Near and Wine Time is Here!

The Hi-Line is seeing more microbreweries emerge with great success from Havre to Glasgow, and that’s great news for “brewsie” sommeliers; but what about wine enthusiasts? Sarah Randolph has the remedy for wine- drinkers this holiday season at her new store Wine Time located in Suite B at 510 2nd Street in historic, downtown Havre.

When asked what inspired her vino-venture, Sarah says, “I think people get overwhelmed when they go to a store a see a wall of wine bottles and have no idea where to start.” That’s where Wine Time comes in–to give customers personalized assistance to find the wine that will pair perfectly with a meal or well enough on its own.

An Illinois native, Randolph has lived across the United States and traveled throughout Europe where her love of wine seemed to grow the more she and her husband traveled. She is balancing this entrepreneurial endeavor with her work as a paralegal, and, so far, the glass seems to more than half full as Wine Time looks forward to the holiday season.

Wine Time specializes in rare and hard to find wines with prices starting at $10/bottle. They have selections that include white, sweet, red, or bubbly along with wine-related merchandise that make great gifts.

November is the beginning of Wine Time’s Wine Club that includes two bottles monthly with tasting notes and origin information. The timing of Wine Club’s launch is perfect for holiday gift-giving and sharing as the new year approaches.

More information on Wine Time’s selections, sales, and club details can be found on the Wine Time Facebook page, through e-mail (winetimemt@ gmail.com), or by calling 719-588-2674.

Results of Annual Fisheries Surveys on Fresno Reservoir

HAVRE – Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks staff recently conducted standardized netting surveys on Fresno Reservoir. These annual surveys take place in September and have been conducted in the reservoir since 1987. These surveys provide important information pertaining to the Fresno fish community and track short- and long-term species trends. The information collected during these surveys aids FWP management of the Fresno fishery.

Walleye were the most abundant
species observed, comprising 60 percent of
the overall number of fish observed. Walleye relative abundance (the number of walleye observed in each net) in this year’s survey was 22.4 walleye/ net, which is above both the five-year average (17.1 walleye/net) and long- term average, dating back to 1987 (15.2 walleye/net). The average length of walleye observed in 2020 was 14.4 inches, with excellent numbers of 9- to 20-inch walleye.

Another bright spot during this year’s survey was the number of yellow perch observed. Yellow perch are the primary forage species in Fresno and are critical to the overall health of the walleye and northern pike populations. Perch also provide recreational benefit to anglers when their population densities are high, especially during the winter months. Yellow perch relative abundance in 2020 was 4.1 perch/net, the highest abundance observed since 2011. The long-term average for yellow perch is 2.4 perch/net.

Northern pike abundance in 2020 was average at 3.5 pike/net, with an average length of 23.5 inches. Other species observed in this year’s survey included black crappie, lake whitefish and longnose suckers.

To increase angling opportunity in Fresno Reservoir, approximately 4,000 rainbow trout were stocked in Fresno in June, and an additional 30,000 8-inch rainbow trout will be stocked in October. FWP encourages anglers to get out and chase these fish this fall and winter.

FWP will begin the planning and development phase of a fisheries management plan for Fresno Reservoir this fall. This effort will solicit the help of an advisory committee to help guide the document. As the plan is developed, there will be numerous opportunities for public involvement, and FWP plans to conduct much of the management planning process virtually. Please stay tuned for further details, and contact biologist Cody Nagel at 406- 265-6177 with any questions.

-FWP-

Region 6 Havre Check Station Results after Opening Weekend of General Hunting Season

HAVRE – Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks staff recently conducted standardized netting surveys on Fresno Reservoir. These annual surveys take place in September and have been conducted in the reservoir since 1987. These surveys provide important information pertaining to the Fresno fish community and track short- and long-term species trends. The information collected during these surveys aids FWP management of the Fresno fishery.

Walleye were the most abundant species observed, comprising 60 percent of the overall number of fish observed. Walleye relative abundance (the number of walleye observed in each net) in this year’s survey was 22.4 walleye/net, which is above both the five-year average (17.1 walleye/net) and long-term average, dating back to 1987 (15.2 walleye/net). The average length of walleye observed in 2020 was 14.4 inches, with excellent numbers of 9- to 20-inch walleye.

Another bright spot during this year’s survey was the number of yellow perch observed. Yellow perch are the primary forage species in Fresno and are critical to the overall health of the walleye and northern pike populations. Perch also provide recreational benefit to anglers when their population densities are high, especially during the winter months. Yellow perch relative abundance in 2020 was 4.1 perch/net, the highest abundance observed since 2011. The long-term average for yellow perch is 2.4 perch/net.

Northern pike abundance in 2020 was average at 3.5 pike/net, with an average length of 23.5 inches. Other species observed in this year’s survey included black crappie, lake whitefish and longnose suckers.

To increase angling opportunity in Fresno Reservoir, approximately 4,000 rainbow trout were stocked in Fresno in June, and an additional 30,000 8-inch rainbow trout will be stocked in October. FWP encourages anglers to get out and chase these fish this fall and winter.

FWP will begin the planning and development phase of a fisheries management plan for Fresno Reservoir this fall. This effort will solicit the help of an advisory committee to help guide the document. As the plan is developed, there will be numerous opportunities for public involvement, and FWP plans to conduct much of the management planning process virtually. Please stay tuned for further details, and contact biologist Cody Nagel at 406- 265-6177 with any questions.

-FWP-

Ranching For Profit Blog – Dallas Mount, CEO

Healthy Land, Happy Families and Profitable Businesses
www.ranchingforprofit.com

Top 10 Challenges In Ranching

In the last ProfitTips I asked you to share the challenges you face in ranching and share you did.

Here is your list of the top 10 challenges facing your ranch:

#10: We have a victim attitude
We will never succeed if all we do is blame others for our failures. Self- proclaimed victims abdicate responsibility for their situation and the power to do something about it.

#9: We have lousy business skills
There is a difference between knowing how to raise livestock and grow crops and knowing how to run a business that raises livestock and grows crops. Our parents and the universities focus on the raising and the growing. Of course The Ranching For Profit School focuses on the business side of things.

#8: Our attitude that Ranching is not a business, it’s a lifestyle
A lot of people seem to believe that business and lifestyle are incompatible. An alumnus once told me that when he and his wife focused on their lifestyle, “All we did was work our butts off.” When they started focusing on the business, he

said, “Our life got so much better.”

#7: Access to leasable land / Fragmentation of ag land
It is getting harder and harder to find leases and the leases we do find tend to be smaller, making it harder to manage them well. Part of finding long-term leases with adequate capacity boils down to being the right person, in the right place, at the right time.

#6: Weather related challenges
Drought, severe storms, heat, cold, you can’t do anything about what Mother Nature is going to throw at us, but you can prepare. While you can’t do anything about how much rains falls there is a lot you can do to make sure whatever does fall soaks in.

#5: Challenges to reaching viable scale that are not land or finance related
This was a complex grouping but the consistent theme was it’s not what you know, it’s who you know. This was particularly important for self-identified first generation ranchers. Difficulty sourcing cattle to lease came up several times.

#4: Can’t find financing / undercapitalization
This grouping was complex. Some people were afraid of debt, others couldn’t get the financing they needed but either way the result was not enough money to build the business they wanted to build. I will tackle this, and many other issues you raised in your responses in future ProfitTips.

#3: Family matters
The only thing tougher than running a business is running a family business. Getting everyone on the same page, talking with one another and working together is challenging. Unless our goal is to hurt one another, we need to learn to air our differences and disagreements respectfully and constructively. Rather than arguing over positions, it helps to focus on the underlying interests. Then, once we’ve all been heard and a decision has been made, we need to learn to put our ego aside and remember that we ride for the brand.

#2: We resist change
It isn’t embracing the new idea that is so difficult. It is letting go of the old one. I’ve read research that shows that we tend to inflate the value of the things we have by a factor of five. In other words, to feel confident letting something go that earns a dollar, the new thing must be able to produce $5.

#1: Time management / WITB v. WOTB
Most of the time management issues boiled down to the seemingly inexhaustible list of chores that keep us working in the business and not working on it.

– Dave Pratt

Real Estate Section

Enjoying Everyday Life
Joyce Meyer

The Key to Peacefully Trusting God

Peace is one of the most precious gifts God has promised
His children. I know, because for many years my life was not
peaceful, and I was miserable. So, to now have this peace and live in God’s rest is a treasure to me. And it is a gift that He wants all of us to have.

But to attain this peace and rest, I had to learn to be patient while God was working in my life, because it didn’t happen overnight. I had to learn to trust God while His peace was being cultivated in me, which is something we all learn in our walk with Him.

A trusting attitude and a patient attitude go hand in hand—when you trust God, you’re able to be more patient. And, when you let go and learn to trust God, it releases joy in your life. The truth is patience is not just about waiting for something…it’s about how you wait, or your attitude while waiting.

The key to it all is humility. Philippians 2:5 (AMPC) says, “Let this same attitude and purpose and [humble] mind be in you which was in Christ Jesus: [Let Him be your example in humility].

Humility may well be one of the most difficult characteristics of the fruit of the Spirit to be cultivated in us—and to maintain. And without humility, it’s not likely that you will put your complete trust in God.

I have learned from personal experience that putting trust in God means there will be some unanswered questions. That was a hard lesson for me because I naturally want to understand everything…to know what’s going on so I can feel like I’m in control.

It’s just human nature to try and figure things out. So, when we’re in the midst of a situation, we usually try to reason our way through it. We generally want to know “Why, God, why?” or “When, God, when?” We want to know the outcome now. Our pride just has a hard time with not knowing, because not knowing means we’re not in control. But humility submits to what God is doing. This is where we must make a decision.

Where Will You Put Your Trust?
Deciding to trust God releases us from feeling like we have to have all the

answers. Proverbs 3:5-6 (NIV) says, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.” The truth is we are just not smart enough to run our own lives…but God is!

And the good news is He will not promise us something and then leave us on our own to make it happen. His Word tells us that “no [one] who believes in Him [who adheres to, relies on, and trusts in Him] will [ever] be put to shame or be disappointed” (Romans 10:11).

Here’s something else I’ve discovered: God won’t give us the ability to solve our own problems. He’s got that covered. But He does give us the capacity to help someone else solve theirs. So, while we are putting our trust in Him to work in our situation, the best thing we can do is focus on being a blessing to others.

Check Your Attitude While You Wait
As I mentioned earlier, another essential part of trusting God is having

patience. It is very important to realize this, because even when a decision is made to trust God, it doesn’t mean that things will just fall into place right away. We may have to wait—and wait longer than we think we should have to—on some things.

It’s important to understand that while we’re waiting, having a negative, impatient attitude will not make God hurry. The Israelites spent 40 years in the wilderness on what could have been an 11-day journey, mainly because of their attitude! When things were not going like they wanted, they began to murmur and complain and ultimately, they sinned against God, simply because they got impatient and stopped trusting Him.

A good question to ask yourself is, Will I continue to trust and obey God when I’m not getting what I want? Will you exercise patience while you wait on Him to work things out for you?

I encourage you to remember Proverbs 3:5-6. Make a conscious decision to put your trust in God…to entrust yourself and everything in your life to Him. Then you will free yourself to focus on loving and being a blessing to others, while you are peaceful and confident that God is working on your behalf.

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For more on this topic, order Joyce’s four-teaching CD series Pursuing What Matters Most. You can also contact us to receive our free magazine, Enjoying Everyday Life, by calling (800) 727-9673 or visiting www.joycemeyer.org.

Joyce Meyer is a New York Times bestselling author and founder of Joyce Meyer Ministries, Inc. She has authored more than 100 books, including Battlefield of the Mind and Unshakeable Trust: Find the Joy of Trusting God at All Times, in All Things (Hachette). She hosts the Enjoying Everyday Life radio and TV programs, which air on hundreds of stations worldwide. For more information, visit www.joycemeyer.orgPlease note: The views and opinions expressed throughout this publication and/or website are those of the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Joyce Meyer Ministtries.

Classifieds

FOR SALE: Used oilfield pipe, rods, cable & guard rail. New HDPE pipe. Engineered bridges for pivots, vehicles, walking & ATV. Clips & post caps.  Toll free- 866-683-7299 or 406-453-7299 BIG SKY PIPE AND SUPPLY, Great Falls. Call TODAY and Ask for our free catalog. VISIT US ONLINE http://bigskypipeandsupply.com/html/      7-I:X

Daily Monday through Friday: Chinook Senior Center has lunch meals available for pick up. $5 for seniors, $6 for others. Cinnamon rolls and other treats available by ordering in advance. Call to find out more or place an order today: 357-2648. 6-I:X

For Sale:  Artwork by Howard Terpning, the foremost painter of Native American related material.  See Montana’s largest display of Terpning art at Big Sky Images & Collectibles in the Havre Holiday Village Mall. 406-399-6522. 11-I

Specialty Fair: Malta City Hall. November 7, 2020. 10a.m. – 4 p.m. Lunch available. Covid restrictions will be honored. Hosted by Phillips County Historical Society. 10-II

FOR SALE: BARGAIN PRICING on 14 to 100 foot Bridges, 8 to 36 inch I Beams, and 12 to 24-inch pipe. Contact Ed toll free- 866-683-7299 or 406-453-7299 BIG SKY PIPE AND SUPPLY, Great Falls. Call TODAY and Ask for our free catalog. VISIT US ONLINE http://bigskypipeandsupply.com/html/     7-I:X

Rudyard Community and Gildford Senior Centers have their menus available on the Rudyard Community Facebook page. Call Rudyard Center (355-4240) or the Gildford Center (376-3170) to schedule meals. 6-I:X

For Sale: Samsung Galaxy watch. In great shape, no scratches, works good, just don’t use it anymore. It can be added to a cell phone plan so it has its own service as well. Asking $200. Call or text 868-0737. 10-II

Specialty Fair: Malta City Hall. November 7, 2020. 10a.m. – 4 p.m. Lunch available. Covid restrictions will be honored. Hosted by Phillips County Historical Society. 10-II

For Sale: 502 13TH AVE, HAVRE. 3 bedroom 1.5 baths. Cottage style Charmer, Nice fenced yard and patio on top of garage. Quiet neighborhood. Price Reduced $125,000. Call Listing agent Steve Zentmire 406-390-0183 10-II

Northern Acres Appraisal Service:  Know what it’s worth!  Call or email Ernest Goettlich, Certified General Real Estate Appraiser at 942-0419 or email northeracresapp@gmail.com. 10-II

Position Opening:  Extension Agent – 4-H/Youth Dev. & Family/Consumer Science- Blaine County, Chinook, MT. Full time. Will provide leadership and educational programming in 4-H/Youth Development and Family and Consumer Sciences. For info and to apply: www.msuextension.org careers. Screening begins October 22, 2020. Equal Opportunity Employer, Veterans/Disabled. 11-I

For Sale: 39890 HWY 2. CHINOOK  A little paradise on the Milk River, approximately 6 acres with a 4 bedroom, 2 bath home, with a 3 stall detached garage, that is attached to 38 by 40 insulated shop. The property has access to the Milk river and 4 acres of vested water rights. 2.92acres is lease ground that will transfer with the sale. Price Reduced $295,000. Call Property West, 406-262-3035. 11-I

For Sale: 2009 Dodge 2500 mega cab 6.7L diesel 123,xxx miles.  Good condition.  Not used on ranch.  Asking $22,000.  Call 406-301-3265 after 5 pm. 11-I

Commercial Location For Sale: Tons of potential!!! Open your own business in this nice commercial location for rent, approximately 600 square feet. Large office and reception area. Would make a nice office, retail or massage location. Next to Oasis Salon at 1611 5th Ave. Water and garbage removal included in rent. $600/ Mo. Please message if you would like to be shown this property.  Contact Susan Turnbull Brurud via Facebook. 10-II

For Sale: Brand new ice fishing house, still in the box. Asking $300 or best offer.  Please private message Matt Markous via Facebook if interested. 10-II

For Sale: Big air compressor.  Ran great when pulled.  I don’t have the time to hook it up.  Asking $500.00 or best offer, or up for trade, depending on what you have for trade private message Mark Markous if interested. 10-II

For Sale: Upper and lower intakes and throttle bodies.  Ford Explorer GT40 and 1988 Lincoln mark 7 HO  $200 OBO.   Contact Jacob McKelvey  via Facebook. 10-II

For Sale:  A Sears and Roebuck Co Sewing Table with an Edgemere sewing machine. They were produced between 1899 and 1903. It was found in a house that hasn’t been lived in for decades. The top has water damage. The drawers are gone, but otherwise seems to be intact. This is a rare machine. Asking $200. Contact Kate Dormady via Facebook. 10-II

For Sale: Beautiful 4 bedroom 3 bath home for sale in Chinook.  House includes small storage shed and play set in backyard and two full city lots to the south.  Asking $225,000.  Contact Tina Alisch via Facebook 10-II

For Sale: 2014 Buick Verano Convenience Sedan 4D.  4 cyl ecotec, heated seats, new tires all trades welcome asking $10,500.  Contact Scott Skoyen via Facebook. 10-II

For Sale: 2018 Chevrolet Colorado LT Pickup 4D 6 ft.  4×4 V6 10,xxx miles, elec seat, tinted windows, back up camera all trades welcome 29,600.  Contact Scott Skoyen via Facebook. 10-II

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